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Unjustified Retribution

Jun 14 | By Tudurte | Views: 571 | Comments: 8
Hi everyone. I want to write a post about something in Filipino culture that is clearly different to the Western culture I was raised in. Having spent the last hour trying to find the word I still don't feel as though I have found it but have narrowed it down to these two words; vindictive and retribution. 

Being married to a Filipina and having spent some time in the Philippines I have come to learn something in their culture that I believe is holding them back as a people and is possibly the cause of all their problems and would love to hear some feedback on this from others. In Filipino culture, if you catch someone doing something wrong you are the troublemaker, not the person doing the wrong. Take for example there is a dangerous dog roaming your baranguy and terrorising people. If you confront the owner and ask them to restrain their dog it is extremely likely you will cause a confrontation and be branded the one making trouble. If you are at a gathering and someone takes one of your beers, and you confront them about it, again you are the troublemaker. It is as though the Filipino thinks they can do what they like and if anyone has a problem with it they are the bad person. Is it retribution or is it vindictiveness? Either way, this mentality puts fear into people and stops them from reporting crimes or even correcting the behaviour of unruly children, pets etc. So in fear of asking the neighbour to untie their dog from it's 1 foot leash and give it some water so it stops barking all day long, no one does anything out of fear of the offender retaliating. I have many examples of this behaviour in many different types of scenarios but i think you understand my gist. 

Some people here talk about what the problems with the Phils are; some say corruption, some terrorism, some drugs, some lack of discipline and education but to me I feel the real problem is the fear of retaliation by a vindictive Filipino. When this type of behaviour becomes accepted, like in the Philippines, it begins eroding at the law. Public servants become corrupt, people stop caring and the wheels of justice slow. Take for example the Shabu problem the Philippines has. How did it even manage to flourish to the stage it is at now? Well, out of fear of retaliation by vindictive locals, the Filipino ignored it and let it grow into what it has become today. Imagine, just for one minute, if the Philippine police were not corrupt and attended every incident like they do in the first world. Imagine they were like Singapore police. Your local shabu dealer would be dobbed in and gone to prison, the man that punched his wife would be arrested, people would not speed and run traffic lights, would not litter so much etc etc. After all the wheels of justice move so slowly what has the local criminal got to fear anyway. By the time he faces court his accusers could easily be dead. My wife has always said if you can not afford justice do not bother with it and if you can afford it you have to be strong and someone people are scared of otherwise you could easily be killed.  You have to have a large and powerful family to get justice.

But this mentality spreads all throughout daily life and really strangles the people. Take for example Duturte and his followers.  I believe after Syria the Philippines is the second most dangerous country in the world for journalists. If you expose a corrupt politician instead of being hailed a hero you will most likely have to go into hiding forever and you will most likely be hounded by supporters who are themselves too scared to speak out so they just tow the line like zombies. Are they even scared or is it just so common there it is considered normal? 

Whatever it is I believe this trait is their biggest problem. It eats away at everything good in society and brings about an almost lawless state where no one has the will to do anything about it and in the end just don't care, they give up hope. You could educate the people, shoot all the junkies, hunt all the terrorists, modernise the country but until people are not just scared to commit a crime but also scared of being caught, and not just for fear of having to pay a bribe but also justice, how can anything improve? 

What are your thoughts? 


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marhead
Jun 15
Absolutely, i see this kind of behavior everyday. They have become so delusional that they cannot understand what is considered wrong and what is considered right in a normal society. I tell my wife this all the time, that filipinos can do no wrong. Everything is accepted and everything is tollerated, bcoz nobody wants to do the right thing. This culture is based on doing the wrong thing and being rewarded for it. You can see it in there eyes, a filipino knows what he is doing is wrong but will continue to do it bcoz there are never any consequences for his actions, never any responsibility. There is no discipline within the society, as children they are taught that they are so uniquely special that what ever they do is tolerated and especially for boys who are treated like gods. There will be no solution here in the land of idiots.Absolutely, i see this kind of behavior everyday. They have become so delusional that they cannot understand what is considered wrong and what is considered right in a normal society. I tell my wife t...See more
dundalli
Jun 15
The Filipino avoids direct confrontation. They are scared of it. Even laughing out loud almost seems unacceptable. They grow up learning that they live in a hierarchical society where connection and money are everything. Better to let the rich guys dog bite you than kick it in the head. Well fuck that...kick it in the head.The Filipino avoids direct confrontation. They are scared of it. Even laughing out loud almost seems unacceptable. They grow up learning that they live in a hierarchical society where connection and m...See more
schindle
Jun 15
That's why anything goes in the PI. The Filipinos are the freest people on Earth, they can do whatever they like. The law turns a blind eye. They should live in the US for one week and see how lucky they are.
redrose28
Jun 15
bullshit....filipino pride
doc
Jun 16
if you ever had children then you know the answer....catch a child with his hand in the cookie jar and you're the bad one...cause you caught them...."natives" here are children...of all ages....they think that way they act that way. Ever watch a child just barge through a door that is opened??? open a door here and you see the same thing only it's not just kids....they all need a good spanking and to be taught manners, respect for others and themselves....we'll get on that right after the snow quits.if you ever had children then you know the answer....catch a child with his hand in the cookie jar and you're the bad one...cause you caught them...."natives" here are children...of all ages...See more
Tudurte
Jun 17
@Redrose. Sure it is Pinoy Pride, absolutely, but where did this attitude evolve from? It had to come from somewhere. And why is there pretty much no other country where the bulk of the people act like this?
Tudurte
Jun 17
@Doc exactly my point, if you catch them you are the bad one. Is there another culture anywhere where this attitude is so widespread? I can understand certain pockets of society engaging in this behaviour but in the Phils it seems to have spread across the whole country and now it is considered normal. Imagine if they did not have this attitude. My ding dong moment was thinking if this behaviour did not exist then so many other problems of the Phils would be solved as I feel it leads to other problems like it is the root cause. Would there be so much corruption if people feared getting caught? Would the shabu problem gotten so bad if they feared getting caught? Like I said in my post, imagine if the cops were not corrupt and people were scared of the law? They sure as hell have a long way to go before they ever achieve these goals.@Doc exactly my point, if you catch them you are the bad one. Is there another culture anywhere where this attitude is so widespread? I can understand certain pockets of society engaging in this behav...See more
TCHoward
Jun 17
With my many years in working for a NGO, as a graduate student, and as a resident, I have seen enough. I have been involved in 2 major incidents- one as the respondent and one as the complainant. Thankfully, as the respondent, I had a pro bono lawyer who was the former law dean of a major university and NO bribes! As the complainant, I had a bona fide case of mass sexual abuse of boys, BUT this bastard was influential and now work at George Mason University in Virginia, United States as a professor.With my many years in working for a NGO, as a graduate student, and as a resident, I have seen enough. I have been involved in 2 major incidents- one as the respondent and one as the complainant. Than...See more
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Pinoy Pride?